August Archives




Amish-made

amish-horse-buggy-ohio

The Miller’s Family Story
By Rocco Satullo, your tour guide to fun!

Amish folk like any other seek greener pastures to stake a claim in the pursuit of happiness.

Harry Miller’s family went from Kansas to Iowa and that’s where he met the love of his life, Lydia. Together, they started a family and added to it after moving to Wisconsin, and from there, Indiana.

The Indiana Amish community was large. Sometimes, Amish adventurers like to start smaller communities and keep things as modest as possible. When they find the right land to begin a community anew, they work together to erect their own schools and such.

An Amish friend and carpenter said to Harry, “Let’s checkout Ohio.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

Click for more story, photos and video clips

Scrimmage: Football in American Art

Tackle the History of Football from the Civil War to the Present

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present is the first comprehensive assembly of work by prominent American artists focusing on football. This exciting new exhibition is on view August 1 – October 29, 2017 with a special public reception on August 10 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Scrimmage will allow audiences from around the country to discover and explore football and art in a community steeped in both. This special exhibition is organized by the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art (formerly the University Art Museum) at Colorado State University, and the Jorden Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

Through works assembled from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the Figge Art Museum, Denver Art Museum, The Rockwell Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts – Houston, Yale University, Canton Museum of Art, and numerous other public and private collections, including paintings, prints, sculptures, and new media, Scrimmage details the history of football from the end of the Civil War to the present, exploring themes such as race, teamwork, and competition for viewers to examine today. Scrimmage features 60 works from American artists including: Winslow Homer, Holiday in Camp, 1865; R. Tait McKenzie, The Onslaught, 1920; Thomas Hart Benton, Forward Pass, 1972; Andy Warhol, O.J. Simpson, 1977; and Ernie Barnes, Fumble in the Line, 1990.

Scrimmage Origins
This exhibition developed as curators discovered that a host of prominent American artists had pictured aspects of football and the public culture surrounding the sport, yet no focused art historical study had examined these images; in fact, very little research has addressed the large body of artworks that engage with sports.

The exhibition is not meant to present a history of football – the development of rules and gradual changes in play, the history of teams or players – but instead offers a window to understanding themes central to American life, both past and current. As such, the exhibition explores these images from multiple perspectives and themes. The Canton Museum of Art invites visitors to engage in a dialogue – with works of important American artists as a springboard – about sports, art, and their roles in our history and culture, and to reflect on how these images reveal attitudes and transitions in American life.

The exhibition is divided into the following eight sections:

Football: the Spectator Sport
How did football, which began as a private extracurricular activity for a small group of young men, become the public spectacle we know today?  Early on the sport was embraced by college administrators who saw benefits, including the potential for financial gain – contributions from alumni and institutional giving loyalty – and increased interest from the press. This exhibition examines the public culture of football as spectator sport. Football soon developed a culture separate from play on the field – bands, cheerleaders, mascots, team colors, pep-rallies, homecoming, and parades – were all introduced early in the history of the sport. These remain vital parts of the culture and have led to modern-day fan-driven activities like tail-gating, team merchandising, and extensive half-time extravaganzas brought to super-size scale at the Super Bowl.  Artists, as fascinated by these phenomena as the game itself, picture these American obsessions.

Class, Race and Ethnicity
Initially isolated to the campuses of the Ivy Leagues, football began as a sport for upper-class white Americans. The exhibition examines issues of class, race, and ethnicity and football’s transition from an Ivy League sport to a mass-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-racial phenomenon. How did this transition happen? Early and frequent press coverage brought football to a mass audience, broadening interest in the sport; at the turn of the century American immigrants began to engage in casual games as a means of assimilation into American life; and, as the American education system democratized, welcoming a wider-spectrum of students to campuses across the country, college football rosters began to reflect a more diverse population.  Despite this, the imagery of football reflects ongoing racial and ethnic prejudice and biases.  While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery.

Football, Struggle, War and the “Strenuous Life”
President Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “strenuous life,” urging American men and boys to develop strength through athletics in preparation for “the rough work of the world.” In a 1900 article entitled “The American Boy” Roosevelt singled out football as a model. He admonished the American boy to engage in “manly exercises and to develop his body” and concluded by writing: “In short, in life, as in a foot-ball game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”  For Roosevelt, the “strenuous life” was also preparation for the necessity of war and keeping America strong.  This exhibit examines artists’ depictions that relate to the promotion of football as a model for masculinity and that suggest analogies to warfare.

Gender in Football: Women’s Roles
Despite Title IX legislation and attempts at developing women’s football leagues, women have not played a role on the gridiron. Yet women figure prominently in football imagery. The exhibition explores how images both perpetuate and challenge gender stereotypes. While Charles Dana Gibson’s The Coming Game: Yale vs. Vassar, 1895, places women as protagonists on the field, the majority of artists portray women in passive and objectified roles.  As adorned spectators, cheerleaders, drum majorettes, women serve as foils that clearly define play on the field as a masculine realm.

Football and Violence
Current discussions about long-term football injuries and the concussion crisis suggest that these concerns are new. Yet, as early as the colonial period, rudimentary forms of football were outlawed and condemned for their violent nature and for provoking incendiary behavior. And, in the early part of the 20th century, despite his love for football, Theodore Roosevelt bemoaned the lawless nature of the game. The troublesome nature of football, explored by artists from the 19th century through the contemporary period, emerged first in a score of illustrations.  In Scrimmage artists picture the extreme physical nature of the sport and its ramifications.

The American Sport
Yale Coach, Walter Camp (1859-1925), widely known as the “father of American football,” envisioned a game that mirrored a model of capitalism, industrial strength, and American ingenuity. Creating rules that clearly distinguished football from what he saw as its unruly English antecedents, Camp’s football imitated an American corporate structure with each player fulfilling a specific assignment, a hierarchy of positions, and managerial roles for quarterback and coaching staff.  In the exhibition, artwork reflects these ideas and other traditions specific to American ways of life, including the association of the Thanksgiving holiday with football, the quarterback as American hero, and the sport as a rite-of-passage.

Celebrity Culture and the Media
The rise of football as an American sport is directly tied to media coverage. In Scrimmage, a number of prints are displayed that were published and widely distributed through a popular press that brought the sport to wide attention. Michael Oriard’s books, Reading Football, and King Football, trace the arc of media coverage from these early prints, through the rise of radio, newsreels, and movies, to the advent of the televised game, chronicling how our mediated world has promoted the sport and its participants. The first televised game took place on December 28, 1958 and gradually, television coverage accentuated spectacle; the use of slow motion, instant replay, half-time interviews and locker room footage, turned the football contest into high drama, and heightened attention to the celebrity status of individual players. Television also transformed the way that football was seen – allowing fans to follow teams from the comfort of their own homes. In this section we examine artists reacting to celebrity culture and to mediated views of football.

Athleticism
The concept of “muscular Christianity” promoted in the late 19th and early 20th century suggested that vigorous exercise and participation in sports competition, developed positive moral characteristics. Popularized, in great part, because of fears that an urbanized workforce lacked physical fitness, the movement promoted strenuous activity.  Football was often a model.  Though not always aligned to the movement of “muscular Christianity” American leadership has repeatedly emphasized the need for physical fitness, athletic achievement, teamwork and sportsmanship.  Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy all stressed the need for improved physical condition; Eisenhower established the President’s Council on Youth Fitness in 1956 and Kennedy urged better physical fitness in light of Cold War competition with a fit Soviet populace.  Today, Michelle Obama promotes “Let’s Move” as a means towards a healthier, less sedentary life.  In this section we examine artists who celebrate the athletic prowess of athletes and the skill and beauty of athletics.

Scrimmage Programming Features:
Along with the exhibit, several collaborative events are planned to bring Scrimmage to life over three months throughout the Canton community:

  • Pro Football Hall of Fame (August 1 – 6) will connect Hall of Fame players to audiences with panel discussions of health issues, race in sports, and the linkage of football and art. Dates and times of the presentations will be announced as they are made available.
  • Arts In Stark ‘The Eleven’ Art Project (August 4) will unveil the newest mural, Super Bowl III, by artist Dirk Rozich with a free public reception at the Cultural Center for the Arts.
  • AULTCARE Family Field Day (September 9) will be a free event to engage in outdoor arts and sports activities, and explore the Scrimmage exhibit through tours led by local high school football coaches at the Canton Museum of Art. 11AM-3PM.
  • Canton Ballet (August – October) will perform variations of Touchdowns and Tutus, a program featuring high school football players paired with dancers to illustrate how players use ballet as a training technique, at various community events.
  • Canton Symphony Orchestra (September 3) will present a Summer in the Park “Tailgating” concert reliving football in music from film and television in advance of NFL season kickoff.
  • Massillon Museum (August – October) continues an exhibit series with its Paul Brown collection, celebrating Brown as the first coach of the Cleveland Browns and a leader in racial integration of football.
  • Canton Palace Theatre (September 7 – 8) will present Football Film Days featuring time-honored football favorites from the movies.
  • Stark District Library (August– October) will be working with the Museum to present programs based on the book “Rudy: My Story,” which was chosen for the Library’s One Book, One Community feature.

This special exhibition has been made possible with support in part by Stark Community Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, ArtsInStark, Aultcare, Visit Canton, and the Key Bank Foundation.

Top 50 Attractions in Ohio

standout-in-ohio-award-seal

Over the past several years, we have recognized 50 of the top attractions in Ohio tourism. In the coming months, we’ll continue our journey until we discover the TOP-100 attractions in Ohio. See 51-100 as they are added each month by clicking here.

Here are 50 Standouts in Ohio Tourism:

Dennison Railroad Depot Museum

Clifton Mill 

Contemporary Arts Center

The American Sign Museum

Great Mohican Pow-Wow

Duck Tape Festival

COSI

Bear’s Mill

Historic Sauder Village

African Safari Wildlife Park:

The Toledo Museum of Art

Castle Noel

Toledo Zoo & Aquarium

Rainbow Hills Vineyards

Bucyrus Bratwurst Festival

All American Soap Box Derby

Historic Roscoe Village

Ghostly Manor Thrill Center

Cedar Point

Freedom Center

Hocking Ice

A Christmas Story House

Pro Football Hall of Fame

Circleville Pumpkin Show

Ohio Renaissance Festival

Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

Cincinnati Union Terminal

Wake Nation

Original Bob Evans Farm

Hartman Rock Garden

Allen County Museum

Warther Museum

Ye Olde Mill

Shadowbox Live

Hocking Hills Canopy Tours

Buckin’ Ohio

USS Cod

Topiary Park

KitchenAid Experience

KD Guest Ranch

The Wilds

National Museum of The U.S. Air Force

The RainForest

Ohio State Reformatory

Jungle Jim’s International Market

Lehman’s Hardware Store

West Side Market

EnterTRAINment Junction

Ohio Caverns

The Unusual Junction

Memphis Kiddie Park

 

Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival

Excerpt from a past edition of OhioTraveler

As we wind down summer,
look ahead to one of Ohio’s favorite Fall fests

Autumn in Roscoe Village is a special time of year. The beautiful scenery of central Ohio’s rolling hills, the crisp mornings that transform into warm afternoons, and the smoky-sweet aroma of homemade apple butter bubbling over an open fire combine to make the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival in Historic Roscoe Village the perfect Fall event.  Now in its 48th year, the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival has attracted crowds of all ages to experience the sights, sounds and flavors of the season.

The three days of the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival officially begin on Friday, October 20th, at 10:00 a.m. Crafters’ booths line the street with an array of unique handmade items including jewelry, home and garden items, paintings, pottery, and other creative discoveries. Of course, no stroll through the festival would be complete without sampling the delicious assortment of unique foods offered by the food vendors, which include home-made soup, apple butter burgers, steak sandwiches, sweet potato fries, cinnamon-roasted nuts, and kettle corn.  The unique Shops of Roscoe Village will be open and welcome festival guests as well.  Those of you who wish to dine later in the evening, be sure to venture into the Village and experience the Warehouse Steak n’ Stein and Uncorked Restaurants.

The dates of the 48th Annual Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival are October 20th, 21st and 22nd. The festival runs from 10:00am to 6:00pm on Friday and Saturday, and 10:00am to 5:00pm on Sunday.  The price of admission is $5.00 for ages 12 years and older, ages 11 years and younger are FREE.  As part of their festival admission, guests will have access to the Living History Buildings in the Village to tour at their leisure. All of the buildings will be fully staffed with costumed interpreters who will relate what life was like in a 19th century port town nestled along the Ohio and Erie Canal.  Younger visitors may also enjoy the kids’ activity area, complete with tin punching and other crafts from the period.

The three day schedule of events is accented by a variety of musical entertainment with performances by traditional dulcimer players, bluegrass bands, gospel singers, and other traditional music artists.  Relax on the wooden benches at the Main Stage area in the center of the Village as you tap your feet in rhythm to the music or dance on the sidelines.

Don’t forget to include a ride on the always popular Monticello III into your visit!  The horse-drawn canal boat, located at the nearby Canal Boat Landing, offers guests a glimpse of life on the canal as well as entertaining stories from the Captain.  A trolley will be available for guests at the Visitor Center on Saturday and Sunday afternoon to catch a ride to the Canal Boat Landing.

On Friday and Saturday evening the eerie candlelight tour, Spirit of Roscoe, will be offered at 7:00pm. On this tour, guests will walk through the historic village while listening to tales of the spirited folk who once resided in this quaint canal town. Reservations are recommended for the candlelight tour. Contact the Visitor Center at 740-622-7644 or 800-877-1830 or visit www.roscoevillage.com for further information.

Yesteryear is Here

wayne county historical society mill village

By Rocco Satullo, your tour guide to fun!

All history is local. If you are traveling the modern streets of Rome, look to one side or another and you may see over a railing down to an excavation revealing what the community looked like thousands of years ago. The contrast is such that you lose yourself for a moment in wonder. So too is it – albeit on a smaller scale – when you drive through a small town in America and suddenly there’s a downtown within a downtown, both hundreds of years apart.

With globalization we have learned so much about so many things on a grand scale, we yearn for new discoveries. Adventurous minds have made remarkable finds in the nooks and crannies of history, often unearthing a vein of gold in the form of fascinating stories that capture the imagination at a local level.   ….Read More….

Click here to read the rest of the story

Adventures on the Great Miami

Adventures on the Great Miami

Where Every Day is an Adventure

With every chirping bird, splashing fish and ray of sunshine, the Ohio summer is begging for you to come out and play. Nestled just a few turns off of I-75 just south of Tipp City, Adventures on the Great Miami is a great place for you and your family to plan your fun both on and off the river.

“We’ve been operating on the Great Miami River for about 8 years now,” Chris Jackson, Owner of Adventures on the Great Miami said. “It started out pretty modestly with the money and knowhow from my concrete business. We just kept adding to the grounds each and every year. Things have really been taking off in the last few, though. It’s an exciting time for sure.”

With a fleet of kayaks, canoes, rafts, tubes and stand up paddleboards available to rent, sunscreen and dressing for the possibility of getting wet is all you really need to worry about. From the launch point and 5-miles back to the property is a nice and easy stretch of river, accommodating to paddlers of any skill levels.

“It’s great seeing all of the different people we get coming through,” Brian Johnson, Marketing Manager said. “You don’t need to worry about much besides the basic skills and safety that we share before seeing you off. The only time I’ve really been concerned about anyone getting on the river is seeing some of the nice shoes they wear.”

Adventures on the Great Miami’s 17-acre grounds also include 10 primitive camping sites, a finished cabin and soon a pair of teepees, so the fun in the sun can continue on into the night.

“It’s really set up for any level of comfort in camping,” Jackson said. “The cabin is fully furnished, the teepees provide your shelter and the camp sites are set up right next to the river or tucked nicely in the woods.”

Throughout the year, Adventures on the Great Miami also hosts a number of unique events. This June they hosted Southwest Ohio’s first ever river race with The Great Miami 12 Mile River Race and Fun Float.

“It’s our first year but we’ve been talking about this for a while so it’s great to see all of the planning come together,” Johnson said. “It’s not just a race either. The fun float is going to have a costume and team flag contest and we’ve got prizes for the team who’s able to collect the most trash on their way down.”

Jackson’s ambitions are no longer limited to his own 17-acres either as Adventures on the Great Miami has started offering boat rental at Troy’s recently remodeled Treasure Island Marina.

“The city’s done a great job in remodeling Treasure Island and I’m thrilled to be a part of what they’re doing,” Jackson said. “Right now we’re doing rentals and trying to host a few classes to get people comfortable on the river. I’ve got some big plans though. Like I’d love to see us hosting an airboat rally there by next summer.”

For hours, location and other information about Adventures on the Great Miami, call 937-266-6252 or visit https://greatmiami.net/.

Sign Museum is a Standout!

American Sign Museum Main Street Cincinnati Ohio

The American Sign Museum is all about signs—signs—everywhere signs …and from every era, too. This one-of-a-kind destination features the rich tradition of sign design and displays vintage signs from 1900 to present. Venture through time and see old wooden, handmade signs turn to gold leaf and glass, light bulbs to neon lights and other techniques that advertise a bygone age. The museum has five main sections dedicated to the different eras of this artistic craft and includes an indoor main street with full-size storefronts and canopy of captivating signs everywhere you look. Click here to see a video feature. To visit, get details here.

standout-in-ohio-award-seal

This award recognizes Ohio’s standouts in tourism. More details about the award and all award recipients are at ohiotraveler.com/standouts-in-ohio-tourism/.

Warther Museum Video

old ohio film videoohio youtube videos
Visit Before You Go Ohio Travel
VIDEO OF THE MONTH

This month’s video features Warther Carvings Museum and Gardens in  Dover, Ohio.

This world class facility is a fitting tribute to Ernest “Mooney” Warther, World’s Master Carver. Warther created a collection of steam locomotives carved of ebony and ivory which have been appraised as priceless by the Smithsonian Institution. The carvings are displayed in a beautiful Swiss chalet which includes a new theater handcrafted of solid curly maple. You will also experience new displays, and the expanded knife making & wood shop. Freida Warther’s Button House is still a sight to see and in the summer the Swiss gardens are magnificent.

Warthers Carvings Museum and Gardens in Dover Ohio

PLAY VIDEO  

Driven to Fame

lincoln-highway-marker

Welcome to the Historic Lincoln Highway

Quick! Think of an important historic highway. Most people first think of the National Road… then think of Route 66.

Mike Hocker, Ohio’s Lincoln Highway Historic Byway Director, explains why these thoughts are common. The National Road was the first major government-commissioned road; accomplished by Jefferson in 1803. It spanned the known country then – from Baltimore to the wilderness of southern Illinois. Route 66 was planned by the government in the 1920s and took travelers from Chicago to L.A.  A popular television show and a hit song made that highway famous.

But thanks to many advocacy groups and recently organized byway organizations, word is getting out that the “Lincoln” was America’s first coast-to-coast paved highway in America.

The Lincoln Highway was not a government project. Rather it was an idea generated by several industrialists who wanted to promote automobile travel. In 1913, the Lincoln Highway was born and named to honor President Abraham Lincoln. In the 50 years following his death, no major commemoration to this much loved president had been made. Numbered routes had not been standardized anywhere in the nation yet, and it was typical in that time to name a road. Through the primary efforts auto industrialists Frank Sieberling, Carl Fisher and Henry Joy, communities large and small, county governments and tiny townships, donations and sweat equity all worked together to link many existing roads and create “the safest and shortest path” to span America. The road ran from Times Square in New York to the San Francisco bay – an astounding 3,389 miles!

The road joined major cities, yet encouraged feeder roads to be built – an endeavor meant not only to promote the automobile era, but also change the way Americans traveled.

“It brought us from the world of short-haul deliveries to virtually anywhere. Communities that weren’t rail towns could easily get goods and services,” Hocker observed.

The Lincoln Highway also ushered in campsites, roadside rests, and diners that evolved into the fast food restaurants we take for granted today. Soon, motor courts, and later, motels, ended the roadside camping that travelers had contended with in earlier days.

Comprehension of the legacy of transportation and change in America’s culture has not been completely understood nor popular, perhaps to due to the generational disconnect from then until now.

“Now we look back and see that it is very important to us,” Hocker continued. “The roadside holds much history in re-used buildings, ghost signs from the nineteen teens to twenties and tiny lingering small-town shops that create a fun romp for travelers to rediscover. While most people think of the National Road and Route 66, we will continue to let people know about “the Father Road” or “Main Street Across America” – two early nicknames of the Lincoln Highway and the businesses and attractions along the historic drive,” Hocker concluded.

Don’t miss the annual Ohio Lincoln Highway Buy-Way Sale. The LH follows generally the older alignments of US Rt 30 through the state. From East Liverpool to Convoy, and every Lincoln Highway community in between (there were over 1,000 yard sale events last year), if you are looking for it, chances are you’ll find it…at yard sale prices! Pick up a free Travelers Guide along the way, too.

Dayton Downtown Adventure

 downtown dayton ohio

This article is from a past edition of OhioTraveler.com

Downtown Dayton is full of adventure in August. First Friday has special offerings as it coincides with Downtown Adventure Night. Whether you are looking for art – music – entertainment – food & drink – or shopping, there’s a fun-filled evening awaiting you in downtown Dayton.

Art

The Collaboratory, 33 N Main St.: Step into one of the most wickedly imaginative minds in Dayton. See the world from a new perspective. Collaborate, as attendees are invited to bring their own found objects or trinkets to add to the installation. Featuring “Crystal City,” an installation-in-progress by Dayton street artist Bobby Blackstone. Also featuring, “The Art Truck” by Street Artist, Robin Dakin, known for his “What’s in Your Hood” paintings on old car and truck hoods will be live painting a “Downtown” Hood, which will be raffled off at the end of the evening.

Dayton Visual Arts Center, 118 N Jefferson St.: Enjoy Remnants and Resonate, an exhibition showcasing the creative ways in which four artists, Christina Pereyma, Susan Byrnes, Kate Kern and Francis Schanberger, find new purpose for life’s left-overs by creating new works out of objects, memories, and dreams once cast aside. Call 224-3822.

Front Street Gallery, 1001 E 2nd St.: This month the Divisible Gallery will hosting a special art events that will display the works of artists from China, Australia, Montreal, NYC, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C. Call 266-3491.

Music

Blind Bob’s, 430 E. Fifth St.: Featuring happy hour from 4 to 8 p.m., $1 off well drinks. Live music by Enkiridian, Grey Host, Caustic Casanova, and Close the Hatch. Call 938-6405.

De’Lish Café, 139 N. Main St.: Featuring Friday Nights Unplugged with live soul, jazz and R&B music from 9-11 p.m. with no cover charge, plus $5 drink specials all night. Call 461-2233.

Dublin Pub, 300 Wayne Ave.:  Featuring Irish First Fridays, with a happy hour from 3-6 along with a performance by Miami Valley Pipes and Drums at 7 p.m.and live music by Lost Celts, an Irish Rock/ American Acoustic/British Folk music band now touring the Midwest starting at 9 p.m. Call 224-7822.

Gilly’s, 132 S. Jefferson St.: Old Skool Groove Night from 8 p.m. to midnight, $5 admission charge. Call 228-8414.

RiverScape MetroPark, 111 E. Monument Ave.: Pickin’ in the Park returns with free, live music by Sawgrass and Old Salt Union. Beer and food available for purchase on-site. Call 274-0126.

Trolley Stop, 530 E. Fifth St.: Live music by Cherry Lee starting at 9:30 p.m.Call 461-1101.

Entertainment

The Black Box Improv Theatre, 518 E. Third St.: Audience members share their social media profiles and watch a whole improvised show devoted to those stories. BYOB. Call for ticket prices and availability. Call 369-0747.

Courthouse Square, N Main St.: Watch adventure seekers rappel down 27 stories in support of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Miami Valley at the Over the Edge VIP ‘Drop Party’ from 5 pm – 8 pm. Enjoy craft beer, wine, food and entertainment inside the Big Brothers Big Sisters VIP ‘Drop Party’ tent. Admission $10. All proceeds benefit BBBSGMV’s mentoring mission. Call 641-6803.

Club Masque, 34 N Jefferson St.: Club Masque has their famous Ab Fab Friday on the first floor showcasing the Masque Men on stage and on the bar with a fantastic Drag Show. Show begins at 11 p. m. Arrive early for seats. On the second floor is Friday Night Lights with music and dancing all night long. Open at5 p.m. with no cover charge in celebration of Downtown Adventure Night. Regular cover charge of $7 21+ and $10 18+ begins at 9 pm. Call 228-2582.

Dayton Chess Club, 18 W. Fifth St.: Dayton Chess Club hosts a Quick tournament for US Chess Federation members. Games are perfect for club chess players and those experienced with online chess games who would like to test their skill over the board. The club opens at 6:30 p.m. and registration ends at7:25 p.m. The first of four games begins at 7:30. Visit daytonchessclub.com for more details. Call 461-6283.

Don Crawford Plaza, Fifth Third Field: Courteous Mass Dayton and Bike Miami Valley are teaming up to present a bike parade as part of Adventure Night! This police-escorted group ride will showcase activities that are part of the special event. Call 496-3825.

MJ’s on Jefferson, 20 N Jefferson St.: Head over to MJ’s for the Mr, King, and Miss Gem City Gay Pride Pageant. An official prelim to the Ohio Gay Pride Pageants featuring the Ohio Gay Pride Royalty and more! Pageant starts at10:30 p.m. $5 for 21+, $7 for 18-20. Call 223-3259.

The Neon, 130 E 5th St.: The Neon will be screening two hit movies, “Absolutely Fabulous,” the hysterical big screen adaptation of the hit British television show, and “Café Society,” Woody Allen’s latest film set in the glitz and glamour of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Call for show times and ticket prices, 222-7469.

Nucleus CoShare, 411 W. Fifth St.: First Friday means it’s time for another Free Workday! From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., visitors can experience what a co-shared office environment is like, and get a preview of the benefits a membership to Nucleus CoShare provides. No time in the day to visit? Stop by their open house from 5- 9 p.m. Call 259-4686.

The Old Courthouse, N Main St.: Old Case Files, this year’s murder trial reenactment is the 1896 case of Albert Frantz, accused of shooting his lover, Bessie Little, on the Ridge Avenue Bridge. One of Dayton’s most notorious court cases, audience members will learn what law and order was like in the Gem City at the turn of the 20th century. Dayton History Members: $12, Non-Members: $15, refreshments and memorabilia available for purchase. Space is limited, starts at 7:30 p.m.  For more information, call 293-2841 Ext. 127.

Omega Music, 318 E 5th St.: Celebrate Omega Music’s 33 1/3 birthday from 10 a.m.-10 p.m., enjoy in store live music and great company. Special merchandise available for purchase. Call 275-9949.

RiverScape MetroPark, 111 E. Monument Ave.: Try your hand at mountain bike skill elements, slacklining, disc golf and more during Urban Outdoor Experience from 5-8 p.m. Call 274-0126.

Spaghetti Warehouse, 36 W 5th St.: Enjoy an interactive mystery show in which one person vanishes and all must work together to untangle the puzzle. Can you put two and two together? $25.95 per person for dinner and interactive mystery show. Show starts at 7 p.m. Reservations Required. Call 461-3913.

Visit http://www.mayhemmystery.us for information.

Victoria Theatre Association, 138 N Main St.: Cool film series- Special Disney Weekend. Enjoy a weekend celebration of Disney films. Invitation only. Get your invitation by registering online. Show starts at 7 p.m. Call 225-7591.

Wiley’s Comedy Joint, 101 Pine St.: Featuring comedian Steve Hofstetter, tickets are $15 with a two-item minimum. Shows starts at 7:15 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Call 224-5653.

Food and Drink

Deaf Monty’s Wine, 22 Brown St.: $2-$3 tastings of select wines. Call 225-9463.

Fifth Street Brewpub, 1600 E. Fifth St.: Pub grub specials from 4-5 p.m. and happy hour ($1 off all draft beer and wine and $1 off all sharing plates) from 4-6 p.m. Call 443-0919.

Shopping

Epic Life Fitness, 118 N. Jefferson St.: Patrons can stop by between 4-8 p.m.to schedule a free assessment and receive 20% off their first package with the purchase of four sessions or more. Call 371-8258.

Clash Dayton, 521 E. Fifth St.: It’s the fifth anniversary for Clash, a boutique shop offering authentic and inspired vintage clothing, plus locally made apparel, jewelry, and accessories. Check out the latest art exhibit while shopping. Call 241-9434.

Salon J Ladner & Spa, 45 S St. Clair St.: Join Salon J Ladner and Spa for Tresses and Dresses and do some easy shopping featuring clothing from LuLaRoe! These beautiful clothing items range from sizes XXS to 3XL. Cash (exact change only) and credit are accepted. Shop from 5:30-7 p.m. Call 220-9441.

Sew Dayton, 261 Wayne Ave.: First Fridays feature the free Stitch n’ Sip event. Bring your own beverage and sewing project and make new sewing friends! The fun starts at 5 p.m. Call 234-7398.

The Downtown Dayton Partnership’s website has a complete list of downtown’s arts and cultural amenities, as well as a dining guide, parking map and much more. Download the Find It Downtown mobile search tool for smartphones at http://mobile.downtowndayton.org.

Chillicothe Audio Walking Tours

tecumseh-chillicothe-walking-tours

This article is from a past edition of OhioTraveler.com

 The Ross-Chillicothe Convention & Visitors Bureau would like to announce the release of their new audio walking tours. Tours are available through iTourMobile, which is the company the bureau contracted with to host and distribute the tours through their mobile application. The iTourMobile app and Ross County audio walking tours are all free to download on your Apple and Android devices.

This initial launch features three audio tours of Ross County and Chillicothe which includes an overview of Ross County’s attractions, Architecture & History, and History & Mystery tours. For visitors, the overview allows them to hear about some of the great sites such as Adena Mansion & Gardens, Tecumseh Outdoor Drama, Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, Ross County Heritage Center, Bainbridge Historical Society, and many more.

Additionally, there are two audio walking tours that will display some of the historic buildings in downtown Chillicothe. The Architecture & History Tour will take you along the streets of downtown to learn some unique facts about the Ross County Courthouse, Carlisle, Canal Warehouse, Majestic Theatre, the Chillicothe Gazette and several more locations. The bureau would like to thank Kevin Coleman of Intrepid Heritage Services for providing the architecture and history content featured within this tour.

For those who enjoy history & mystery, the third tour provides listeners a walking tour that provides details of buildings’ history but also stories of the paranormal. These locations have been featured on the Ghost Walk over the years, and have plenty of mystery surrounding their existence. Some of the locations you’ll visit and hear about include the Majestic Theatre, Crosskeys Tavern, the Oddfellows

Lodge above Bernie & Max Stained Glass Studio and nine additional locations. The bureau would like to thank the League of Women Voters for sharing their stories from the Ghost Walk to be featured within this tour.

The audio walking tours were created by the bureau to provide visitors with the opportunity to learn about our local history and historic sites outside of the traditional museum hours. As with many destinations, this also allows the Ross Chillicothe Convention & Visitors Bureau to utilize technology to provide convenient, on-demand tour options for visitors in our area.

For more information about these audio tours, or for additional printable walking tour options, visit the bureau’s website at www.VisitChillicotheOhio.com.

Welcome to the Big Pop!

wyandot-popcorn-popper

Ohio is popping with history but in Marion, that history tastes delicious with an added touch of butter – or salt – or caramel – or…

Welcome to the big top, literally. Step right up folks, the world’s largest popcorn museum is inside a circus tent inside a historic building.

Before you see anything, you smell it! MM-mmm-mm! Fresh roasted popcorn. Just before you catch yourself drooling, your eyes will turn as wide as saucers when the giant red, white and blue circus tent comes into view.

The main attraction is the world famous Wyandot Popcorn Museum. It’s the largest on the planet and only one of two in the country. It just so happens that the other one is also in Ohio. Go figure.

The bright and colorful circus tent puts everyone in a festive mood. Then you see these fascinating nickel plated contraptions that look more like priceless pieces of art. But its art that moves. Careful, the intricate interlinking parts of these unique machines will mesmerize you. So will the craftsmanship.

Imagine a steam whistle blowing.

Here you don’t have to imagine it because you’ll hear it – for real. But for safety purposes, the steam whistles on these polished like new relics are now generated by air compressors.

Timeout for a trivia question: What are non-popped kernels called?
Answer: Old Maids.

Okay, back to the story.

This creative and interactive museum features more than 50 popcorn machines – many doubled as peanut roasters (5 or 6 peanut roasting only machines). The collection features a few horse drawn carts, a 1927 Ford Model TT Concession Wagon, 1911 Dunbar Wagon, Cretors 1899 No. 1 Popcorn Cart, 1896 Kingery steam-driven wagon, and 1892 Olson store-type dry popper.

Here’s a side note about that 1911 Dunbar Wagon. The museum founder, George Brown, son of the Wyandot Popcorn Company founder, William “Hoover” Brown, decided to drive over to the Mid-Ohio Raceway one day in the early 1980s.  Native Ohioan and famed Hollywood actor, Paul Newman, was there with his race team. George and Paul struck up a conversation about popcorn of all things. George grew up in the business and Paul wanted to launch a line of popcorn for his Newman’s Own brand. But he needed the right supplier. That day he found one. They shook hands and next, the Brown family found themselves in New York’s Central Park with Newman and his business partner Al Hutchner launching their line of jarred popcorn in 1984. George’s wife, Millie, posed for a photograph with Paul Newman with a perfect vintage 1911 Dunbar Wagon as a backdrop. That wagon is in the Wyandot Popcorn Museum today.

The museum teaches all kinds of interesting things about popcorn history and Wyandot Popcorn Company’s part in that. For example, in 1948 an archaeological dig in “Bat Cave”, New Mexico turned up what many believe to be the oldest ears of popcorn ever found, dating well over a thousand years old. Popcorn was originally prepared by Native Americans using a bowl containing sand and placing the bowl over fire. The sand heated the kernels and when they popped, they popped to the top of the sand.

Now let’s fast forward to modern history and the early movie theaters. Movie theater popcorn started when street vendors began setting up in front of movie houses.  At first, theater owners chased the vendors away. But when they saw how much movie goers loved the popped corn, theater owners saw dollar signs and invited the vendors inside. Then they realized they don’t need the vendors, just the machines. So the movie theater snack bar was born.  In 1948, Popped Right Corn Company became a subsidiary of Wyandot Popcorn Company to supply theater chains with popped popcorn.

But the Wyandot story and how it contributed to the history of popcorn began during The Great Depression. That’s when William “Hoover” Brown decided to plant 100 acres of popcorn to see how things would go. Well, things went well. And that’s how Wyandot Popcorn Company got its start in 1936. Years later, Golden Crisp and Caramel Corn were named by Ava Brown, “Hoover’s” wife, for the Shirk Candy Company which is still open in Marion, Ohio today.

“Hoover” and Ava’s son, George, gained interest in the popcorn industry, naturally, and in the 1970’s, he wanted to write a book about it.

His passion brought him to auctions where he acquired old broken down popcorn machines and peanut roasters. He then found a superb restorer in Bob Pearson of Kansas to transform the vintage machines to their original condition. They looked brand new again. Other restorers over the years included Roy Arrington in Las Vegas, NV and several of Wyandot’s own restoring experts. And although George never wrote his book, he became a treasure trove of information and thus a reliable source for others who wrote books about the popcorn industry.

George’s private collection grew so big, he decided to open a museum in 1982 at the Wyandot Popcorn Company’s headquarters in Marion. The museum grew more and found new homes for the public to come marvel at the colorful history of popcorn and experience it firsthand. Locations included the Southland Mall. After that, the collection was pieced out to multiple locations like the old COSI (Center of Science & Industry) museum building in Columbus, Ohio to feature displays.

Finally, in 1989, The Wyandot Popcorn Museum found a permanent home at Heritage Hall – the old 1910 Marion post office building – along with the Marion County Historical Society Museum. The Wyandot Popcorn Museum is inside what used as a sizeable mail sorting room in the 1930s which is now transformed by the big top circus tent.

Today Wyandot Popcorn Company in Marion, Ohio creates popcorn for a major brand to private label. Who that company is shall remain a secret.

Not only is Marion, Ohio home to the largest popcorn museum in the world, it hosts the largest popcorn festival in the world. The American Bus Association previously named The Marion Popcorn Festival one of the top-100 events in North America. The festival is always held during the weekend after Labor Day and attracts about a quarter million people annually. Details about the fest are at PopcornFestival.com.

Wyandot Popcorn Museum is open from 1pm – 4pm on weekends except in January and February and major holidays. It is located at 169 E. Church Street in Marion, Ohio. Admission is $4/adult, $3/senior, $1.50 for school age kids and free for preschoolers. For more information, call 740-387-4255 or visit WyandotPopcornMus.com.

One more thing – everyone leaves the museum with a FREE box of popcorn! Now, get to Marion, Ohio and see what’s poppin’ for you.

By Frank R. Satullo, The OhioTraveler

A Beacon of Freedom on a Hill

John Rankin House in Ripley Ohio

The John Rankin House is a National Historic Landmark and famous station on the Underground Railroad.

The brick home was built in 1825 by Reverand John Rankin and sits high atop Freedom Hill overlooking the small river town of Ripley, Ohio. It features extraordinary tales of bravery and fantastic views of the Ohio River and its meandering bends between the Appalachian foothills of southern Ohio and northern Kentucky.

Rankin began his 44 year ministry of Ripley’s Presbyterian church in 1822. He and his wife and 13 children were ardent abolitionists. They dedicated their lives to helping their fellow human beings. Reverend John Rankin was one of the most active “conductors” on the Underground Railroad. His family never lost a “passenger” along their trek of the line. It is estimated that more than 2,000 “passengers” stayed at the Rankin House over the years. At times, up to a dozen runaway slaves lived in the humble brick home in addition to the 15 family members. It only took one encounter for slave owners and hunters to learn not to try and seize escaped slaves from the Rankin’s. Family members always stood armed and watchful.

The Harriet Beecher Stowe novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, cites a true story of a lady pushing her child across the thin ice on the Ohio River, desperate to cross to the Rankin House. When a slave hunter met her on the other side, he was so moved by watching her determination that he let her pass through to the home on the hill shining its candle in the window at night to guide her and so many other escaped slaves to potential freedom.

Merely crossing the Ohio River didn’t bring freedom even though Ohio was a free state. The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 meant runaway slaves could be apprehended in free states and returned to slavery. The Underground Railroad had to get its “passengers” into Canada. Making it to the Rankin House was a milestone to be sure but the final trek from southern Ohio to northern Ohio and ultimately out of the United States still had many obstacles to maneuver.

The modest home has received more than $1 million in renovations to return it to an authentic representation of how it was when the Rankin family lived there. It is quite a time capsule.

The floorboards are original and in great shape. Several original family items remain, too, such as the family’s Bible. Tours are given by well-informed guides. They learn important information to share but are encouraged to do some of their own research to come up with additional points of interest to further make the Rankin House story come alive for its visitors. A young tour guide named Niya found in her personal research that her fourth generation grandfather was at the Rankin’s house in the 1840s.

This little place in the middle of nowhere attracts many visitors and has a large parking lot. The tour takes about 30 minutes. Another 30 minutes can be spent taking in the incredible scenery of the forested hills and Ohio River stretching east and west as far as the eyes can see.

There is a nominal fee for the tour but it only costs about twelve bucks for a family of four. It is open May through October from Wednesday through Sunday. The John Rankin House is located at 6152 Rankin Hill Road in Ripley, Ohio. For additional information, call 1-800-752-2705 or click here.

The John Rankin House is one of those little stops you will be always remember.

August Ohio County Fairs

ohio county fairs

Ohio county fairs in August:

Auglaize County Fair in Wapakoneta
http://www.auglaizecountyfair.org/

Greene County Fair in Xenia
www.greenecountyfairgrounds.com/

Medina County Fair in Medina
http://www.medina-fair.com/

Gallia County Fair in Gallipolis
http://galliacountyfair.org/

Columbiana County Fair in Lisbon
http://www.columbianacountyfair.org/

Wood County Fair in Bowling Green
http://www.woodcounty-fair.com/

Champaign County Fair in Urbana
http://www.champaigncountyfair.com/

Athens County Fair in Athens
http://www.athenscofair.org/

Ross County Fair in Chillicothe
http://www.rosscountyfair.com/

Licking County Hartford Fair in Croton
http://www.hartfordfair.com/

Richland County Fair in Mansfield
http://www.richlandcountyfair.com/

Cuyahoga County Fair in Berea
http://www.cuyfair.com/

Scioto County Fair in Lucasville
http://www.sciotocountyfair.com/

Ashtabula County Fair in Jefferson
http://www.ashtabulafair.com/

Erie County Fair in Sandusky
http://www.eriecountyohiofair.com/

Hamilton County Fair in Carthage
http://www.hamiltoncountyfair.com/

Seneca County Fair in Attica
http://www.atticafair.com/

Henry County Fair in Napoleon
http://www.henrycountyfair.org/

Mercer County Fair in Celina
www.mercercountyohiofair.com/

Miami County Fair in Troy
http://www.miamicountyohiofair.com/

Muskingum County Fair in Zanesville
http://www.muskingumcofair.com/

Holmes County Fair in Millersburg
http://www.holmescountyfair.com/

Huron County Fair in Norwalk
http://www.huroncountyfair.com/

Meigs County Fair in Pomeroy
http://www.themeigscountyfair.com/

Jefferson County Fair in Smithfield
Click here

Allen County Fair in Lima
http://www.allencountyfair.org/

Darke County Fair in Greenville
http://www.darkecountyfair.com/

Defiance County Fair in Hicksville
http://www.defiancefair.com/

Monroe County Fair in Woodsfield
http://www.monroecountyfair.net/

Lorain County Fair in Wellington
http://www.loraincountyfair.com/

Portage County Fair in Randolph
http://www.randolphfair.com/

Sandusky County Fair in Fremont
http://www.sanduskycountyfair.com/

Noble County Fair in Caldwell
http://www.noblecountyfair.net/

Morrow County Fair in Mount Gilead
www.mtgilead.com/fair_main.htm

Stark County Fair in Canton
http://www.starkcountyfair.com/