OHIO TRAVEL & TOURISM GUIDE TO OHIO ATTRACTIONS
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Scrimmage: Football in American Art

Tackle the History of Football from the Civil War to the Present

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present is the first comprehensive assembly of work by prominent American artists focusing on football. This exciting new exhibition is on view August 1 – October 29, 2017 with a special public reception on August 10 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Scrimmage will allow audiences from around the country to discover and explore football and art in a community steeped in both. This special exhibition is organized by the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art (formerly the University Art Museum) at Colorado State University, and the Jorden Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

Through works assembled from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the Figge Art Museum, Denver Art Museum, The Rockwell Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts – Houston, Yale University, Canton Museum of Art, and numerous other public and private collections, including paintings, prints, sculptures, and new media, Scrimmage details the history of football from the end of the Civil War to the present, exploring themes such as race, teamwork, and competition for viewers to examine today. Scrimmage features 60 works from American artists including: Winslow Homer, Holiday in Camp, 1865; R. Tait McKenzie, The Onslaught, 1920; Thomas Hart Benton, Forward Pass, 1972; Andy Warhol, O.J. Simpson, 1977; and Ernie Barnes, Fumble in the Line, 1990.

Scrimmage Origins
This exhibition developed as curators discovered that a host of prominent American artists had pictured aspects of football and the public culture surrounding the sport, yet no focused art historical study had examined these images; in fact, very little research has addressed the large body of artworks that engage with sports.

The exhibition is not meant to present a history of football – the development of rules and gradual changes in play, the history of teams or players – but instead offers a window to understanding themes central to American life, both past and current. As such, the exhibition explores these images from multiple perspectives and themes. The Canton Museum of Art invites visitors to engage in a dialogue – with works of important American artists as a springboard – about sports, art, and their roles in our history and culture, and to reflect on how these images reveal attitudes and transitions in American life.

The exhibition is divided into the following eight sections:

Football: the Spectator Sport
How did football, which began as a private extracurricular activity for a small group of young men, become the public spectacle we know today?  Early on the sport was embraced by college administrators who saw benefits, including the potential for financial gain – contributions from alumni and institutional giving loyalty – and increased interest from the press. This exhibition examines the public culture of football as spectator sport. Football soon developed a culture separate from play on the field – bands, cheerleaders, mascots, team colors, pep-rallies, homecoming, and parades – were all introduced early in the history of the sport. These remain vital parts of the culture and have led to modern-day fan-driven activities like tail-gating, team merchandising, and extensive half-time extravaganzas brought to super-size scale at the Super Bowl.  Artists, as fascinated by these phenomena as the game itself, picture these American obsessions.

Class, Race and Ethnicity
Initially isolated to the campuses of the Ivy Leagues, football began as a sport for upper-class white Americans. The exhibition examines issues of class, race, and ethnicity and football’s transition from an Ivy League sport to a mass-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-racial phenomenon. How did this transition happen? Early and frequent press coverage brought football to a mass audience, broadening interest in the sport; at the turn of the century American immigrants began to engage in casual games as a means of assimilation into American life; and, as the American education system democratized, welcoming a wider-spectrum of students to campuses across the country, college football rosters began to reflect a more diverse population.  Despite this, the imagery of football reflects ongoing racial and ethnic prejudice and biases.  While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery.

Football, Struggle, War and the “Strenuous Life”
President Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “strenuous life,” urging American men and boys to develop strength through athletics in preparation for “the rough work of the world.” In a 1900 article entitled “The American Boy” Roosevelt singled out football as a model. He admonished the American boy to engage in “manly exercises and to develop his body” and concluded by writing: “In short, in life, as in a foot-ball game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”  For Roosevelt, the “strenuous life” was also preparation for the necessity of war and keeping America strong.  This exhibit examines artists’ depictions that relate to the promotion of football as a model for masculinity and that suggest analogies to warfare.

Gender in Football: Women’s Roles
Despite Title IX legislation and attempts at developing women’s football leagues, women have not played a role on the gridiron. Yet women figure prominently in football imagery. The exhibition explores how images both perpetuate and challenge gender stereotypes. While Charles Dana Gibson’s The Coming Game: Yale vs. Vassar, 1895, places women as protagonists on the field, the majority of artists portray women in passive and objectified roles.  As adorned spectators, cheerleaders, drum majorettes, women serve as foils that clearly define play on the field as a masculine realm.

Football and Violence
Current discussions about long-term football injuries and the concussion crisis suggest that these concerns are new. Yet, as early as the colonial period, rudimentary forms of football were outlawed and condemned for their violent nature and for provoking incendiary behavior. And, in the early part of the 20th century, despite his love for football, Theodore Roosevelt bemoaned the lawless nature of the game. The troublesome nature of football, explored by artists from the 19th century through the contemporary period, emerged first in a score of illustrations.  In Scrimmage artists picture the extreme physical nature of the sport and its ramifications.

The American Sport
Yale Coach, Walter Camp (1859-1925), widely known as the “father of American football,” envisioned a game that mirrored a model of capitalism, industrial strength, and American ingenuity. Creating rules that clearly distinguished football from what he saw as its unruly English antecedents, Camp’s football imitated an American corporate structure with each player fulfilling a specific assignment, a hierarchy of positions, and managerial roles for quarterback and coaching staff.  In the exhibition, artwork reflects these ideas and other traditions specific to American ways of life, including the association of the Thanksgiving holiday with football, the quarterback as American hero, and the sport as a rite-of-passage.

Celebrity Culture and the Media
The rise of football as an American sport is directly tied to media coverage. In Scrimmage, a number of prints are displayed that were published and widely distributed through a popular press that brought the sport to wide attention. Michael Oriard’s books, Reading Football, and King Football, trace the arc of media coverage from these early prints, through the rise of radio, newsreels, and movies, to the advent of the televised game, chronicling how our mediated world has promoted the sport and its participants. The first televised game took place on December 28, 1958 and gradually, television coverage accentuated spectacle; the use of slow motion, instant replay, half-time interviews and locker room footage, turned the football contest into high drama, and heightened attention to the celebrity status of individual players. Television also transformed the way that football was seen – allowing fans to follow teams from the comfort of their own homes. In this section we examine artists reacting to celebrity culture and to mediated views of football.

Athleticism
The concept of “muscular Christianity” promoted in the late 19th and early 20th century suggested that vigorous exercise and participation in sports competition, developed positive moral characteristics. Popularized, in great part, because of fears that an urbanized workforce lacked physical fitness, the movement promoted strenuous activity.  Football was often a model.  Though not always aligned to the movement of “muscular Christianity” American leadership has repeatedly emphasized the need for physical fitness, athletic achievement, teamwork and sportsmanship.  Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy all stressed the need for improved physical condition; Eisenhower established the President’s Council on Youth Fitness in 1956 and Kennedy urged better physical fitness in light of Cold War competition with a fit Soviet populace.  Today, Michelle Obama promotes “Let’s Move” as a means towards a healthier, less sedentary life.  In this section we examine artists who celebrate the athletic prowess of athletes and the skill and beauty of athletics.

Scrimmage Programming Features:
Along with the exhibit, several collaborative events are planned to bring Scrimmage to life over three months throughout the Canton community:

  • Pro Football Hall of Fame (August 1 – 6) will connect Hall of Fame players to audiences with panel discussions of health issues, race in sports, and the linkage of football and art. Dates and times of the presentations will be announced as they are made available.
  • Arts In Stark ‘The Eleven’ Art Project (August 4) will unveil the newest mural, Super Bowl III, by artist Dirk Rozich with a free public reception at the Cultural Center for the Arts.
  • AULTCARE Family Field Day (September 9) will be a free event to engage in outdoor arts and sports activities, and explore the Scrimmage exhibit through tours led by local high school football coaches at the Canton Museum of Art. 11AM-3PM.
  • Canton Ballet (August – October) will perform variations of Touchdowns and Tutus, a program featuring high school football players paired with dancers to illustrate how players use ballet as a training technique, at various community events.
  • Canton Symphony Orchestra (September 3) will present a Summer in the Park “Tailgating” concert reliving football in music from film and television in advance of NFL season kickoff.
  • Massillon Museum (August – October) continues an exhibit series with its Paul Brown collection, celebrating Brown as the first coach of the Cleveland Browns and a leader in racial integration of football.
  • Canton Palace Theatre (September 7 – 8) will present Football Film Days featuring time-honored football favorites from the movies.
  • Stark District Library (August– October) will be working with the Museum to present programs based on the book “Rudy: My Story,” which was chosen for the Library’s One Book, One Community feature.

This special exhibition has been made possible with support in part by Stark Community Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, ArtsInStark, Aultcare, Visit Canton, and the Key Bank Foundation.

Ready. Aim. Coshocton!

Coshocton County is in the Crosshairs of Ohio Hunting
By Rocco Satullo, your tour guide to fun!

Hunters across the United States are recognizing Coshocton County, Ohio as the place for game. It’s often ranked as the top county in Ohio for deer kills and is consistently ranked in the top-three. But it’s really open season year-round for a variety of prey.

Hunting animals is what put man atop the food chain. It was essential to his evolution. Meat-eating supercharged human brain activity by giving it the calories needed to advance. Man’s brain uses far more energy than any other muscle in the body. Once this incredible energy source was introduced to his diet, man surged ahead of all living creatures on Earth. Today, man still has an incentive to hunt that dates back over two million years – food.  Click here to read the rest of the story.

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Yesteryear is Here

wayne county historical society mill village

By Rocco Satullo, your tour guide to fun!

All history is local. If you are traveling the modern streets of Rome, look to one side or another and you may see over a railing down to an excavation revealing what the community looked like thousands of years ago. The contrast is such that you lose yourself for a moment in wonder. So too is it – albeit on a smaller scale – when you drive through a small town in America and suddenly there’s a downtown within a downtown, both hundreds of years apart.

With globalization we have learned so much about so many things on a grand scale, we yearn for new discoveries. Adventurous minds have made remarkable finds in the nooks and crannies of history, often unearthing a vein of gold in the form of fascinating stories that capture the imagination at a local level.   ….Read More….

Click here to read the rest of the story

August Ohio County Fairs

ohio county fairs

Ohio county fairs in August:

Auglaize County Fair in Wapakoneta
http://www.auglaizecountyfair.org/

Greene County Fair in Xenia
www.greenecountyfairgrounds.com/

Medina County Fair in Medina
http://www.medina-fair.com/

Gallia County Fair in Gallipolis
http://galliacountyfair.org/

Columbiana County Fair in Lisbon
http://www.columbianacountyfair.org/

Wood County Fair in Bowling Green
http://www.woodcounty-fair.com/

Champaign County Fair in Urbana
http://www.champaigncountyfair.com/

Athens County Fair in Athens
http://www.athenscofair.org/

Ross County Fair in Chillicothe
http://www.rosscountyfair.com/

Licking County Hartford Fair in Croton
http://www.hartfordfair.com/

Richland County Fair in Mansfield
http://www.richlandcountyfair.com/

Cuyahoga County Fair in Berea
http://www.cuyfair.com/

Scioto County Fair in Lucasville
http://www.sciotocountyfair.com/

Ashtabula County Fair in Jefferson
http://www.ashtabulafair.com/

Erie County Fair in Sandusky
http://www.eriecountyohiofair.com/

Hamilton County Fair in Carthage
http://www.hamiltoncountyfair.com/

Seneca County Fair in Attica
http://www.atticafair.com/

Henry County Fair in Napoleon
http://www.henrycountyfair.org/

Mercer County Fair in Celina
www.mercercountyohiofair.com/

Miami County Fair in Troy
http://www.miamicountyohiofair.com/

Muskingum County Fair in Zanesville
http://www.muskingumcofair.com/

Holmes County Fair in Millersburg
http://www.holmescountyfair.com/

Huron County Fair in Norwalk
http://www.huroncountyfair.com/

Meigs County Fair in Pomeroy
http://www.themeigscountyfair.com/

Jefferson County Fair in Smithfield
Click here

Allen County Fair in Lima
http://www.allencountyfair.org/

Darke County Fair in Greenville
http://www.darkecountyfair.com/

Defiance County Fair in Hicksville
http://www.defiancefair.com/

Monroe County Fair in Woodsfield
http://www.monroecountyfair.net/

Lorain County Fair in Wellington
http://www.loraincountyfair.com/

Portage County Fair in Randolph
http://www.randolphfair.com/

Sandusky County Fair in Fremont
http://www.sanduskycountyfair.com/

Noble County Fair in Caldwell
http://www.noblecountyfair.net/

Morrow County Fair in Mount Gilead
www.mtgilead.com/fair_main.htm

Stark County Fair in Canton
http://www.starkcountyfair.com/

WWII Submarine Tour Video

old ohio film videoohio youtube videos
Visit Before You Go Ohio Travel
VIDEO OF THE MONTH

This month’s video features a historic World War II submarine docked at Cleveland’s North Coast Harbor. Tours are available most of the year. Take your virtual tour here – https://www.youtube.com.

Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival

Autumn in Roscoe Village is a special time of year. The beautiful scenery of central Ohio’s rolling hills, the crisp mornings that transform into warm afternoons, and the smoky-sweet aroma of homemade apple butter bubbling over an open fire combine to make the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival in Historic Roscoe Village the perfect Fall event.  Now in its 48th year, the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival has attracted crowds of all ages to experience the sights, sounds and flavors of the season.

The three days of the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival officially begin on Friday, October 20th, at 10:00 a.m. Crafters’ booths line the street with an array of unique handmade items including jewelry, home and garden items, paintings, pottery, and other creative discoveries. Of course, no stroll through the festival would be complete without sampling the delicious assortment of unique foods offered by the food vendors, which include home-made soup, apple butter burgers, steak sandwiches, sweet potato fries, cinnamon-roasted nuts, and kettle corn.  The unique Shops of Roscoe Village will be open and welcome festival guests as well.  Those of you who wish to dine later in the evening, be sure to venture into the Village and experience the Warehouse Steak n’ Stein and Uncorked Restaurants.

The dates of the 48th Annual Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival are October 20th, 21st and 22nd. The festival runs from 10:00am to 6:00pm on Friday and Saturday, and 10:00am to 5:00pm on Sunday.  The price of admission is $5.00 for ages 12 years and older, ages 11 years and younger are FREE.  As part of their festival admission, guests will have access to the Living History Buildings in the Village to tour at their leisure. All of the buildings will be fully staffed with costumed interpreters who will relate what life was like in a 19th century port town nestled along the Ohio and Erie Canal.  Younger visitors may also enjoy the kids’ activity area, complete with tin punching and other crafts from the period.

The three day schedule of events is accented by a variety of musical entertainment with performances by traditional dulcimer players, bluegrass bands, gospel singers, and other traditional music artists.  Relax on the wooden benches at the Main Stage area in the center of the Village as you tap your feet in rhythm to the music or dance on the sidelines.

Don’t forget to include a ride on the always popular Monticello III into your visit!  The horse-drawn canal boat, located at the nearby Canal Boat Landing, offers guests a glimpse of life on the canal as well as entertaining stories from the Captain.  A trolley will be available for guests at the Visitor Center on Saturday and Sunday afternoon to catch a ride to the Canal Boat Landing.

On Friday and Saturday evening the eerie candlelight tour, Spirit of Roscoe, will be offered at 7:00pm. On this tour, guests will walk through the historic village while listening to tales of the spirited folk who once resided in this quaint canal town. Reservations are recommended for the candlelight tour. Contact the Visitor Center at 740-622-7644 or 800-877-1830 or visit www.roscoevillage.com for further information.

Secret & Lost Amusement Parks

The Secret and Lost Amusement Parks of Ohio

What can be better than going to an amusement park to ride roller-coasters? How about going to a park with coasters but its rarely open to the public. Ah, anyone getting an image of golden tickets to enter the Willie Wonka Chocolate Factory?

Well, it’s kind of like that.

Stricker’s Grove in Hamilton, Ohio is open to the public only four times a year: Fourth of July; Family Day, which is always the second Sunday in August; Labor Day; and Customer Appreciation Day, which is in October.

Ralph Stricker is the only person in the United States to build his own coaster. Construction was started in November, 1990 and completed in June, 1993. The Tornado is a wooden roller coaster. The second roller coaster at this little-known amusement park is the Teddy Bear. The original Teddy Bear was located in kiddie land at Coney Island in Cincinnati. Ralph Stricker obtained the blueprints and rebuilt the Teddy Bear at Stricker’s Grove.

The park also has a train, Ferris wheel, Merry Go Round, Scrambler, Tilt A Whirl, pirate ship, flying scooters and other rides, including kiddie cars, boats and rockets.  In addition to the rides, Stricker’s Grove also has an 18 hole miniature golf course, arcade with video games and skeeball, shooting gallery, horseshoes and more.

Stricker’s Grove is a family-owned and operated private amusement park available to rent to groups, organizations, and churches for family picnics, wedding receptions, meetings, etc. for groups of 500 or more from mid-May to early October. Unlike most other parks, Stricker’s Grove only rents to one group most of the time, therefore, guaranteeing complete privacy without the hassle of sharing the park and picnic facilities.  For more park information, click here.

Stricker’s Grove may be Ohio’s best kept secret as far as amusement parks go but some parks of its nature are forever lost to time.

Chippewa Lake Amusement Park was located at Chippewa Lake south of Cleveland. It operated for 100 years, finally closing in 1978 due to the lack of attendance. After the park died, it birthed renewed interest but for all the wrong reasons. Although it closed for good, its rides remained largely intact but neglected for the next 30 years. It became a stunning site as nature grew around the fun park’s once colorful rides. Perhaps the most picturesque scene today is the Ferris wheel that still stands but with an enormous tree that grew up from the ground, dead center, and now shoots through the top, towering over the rusted metal frame. Much of the decay began to pose such safety issues for trespassers that over recent years, rides such as the old wooden roller-coaster were turned to rubble. Here is a video of what was still left behind as recently as just a few years ago. Click here to play the video.

LeSourdsville Lake Amusement Park was located in Middletown, Ohio where signs of its past are still there. The park dates back to 1922 when it was a family retreat for picnicking, mostly. It added rides in the 1940s and became a regional amusement park that served up summer memories for generations. In the 1970s it changed its name to Americana Amusement Park. But in 1990 a freak electrical fire did millions of dollars worth of damage. It struggled afterward. Nearby Kings Island contributed to that. Finally, it closed its turnstiles in 1999. It came up for one last gasp of air in 2002, reclaiming its original name but this rebirth was short-lived. Since then, its rides were demolished and sold off.

A more recent casualty of the amusement park world is Geauga Lake in Aurora, Ohio. It was one of the big-3 amusement parks in the state and was also one of the oldest. It had major roller-coasters that competed with Cedar Point. But with Cedar Point’s world acclaim, perhaps the northern part of Ohio just wasn’t big enough to support the two major parks. However, it wasn’t the first major park to shutter its doors at Geauga Lake. There was a time in the 1970s when one side of the lake hosted the amusement park and the other was home to Sea World. Sea World Ohio lasted from 1970 to 2000. The site later became a water park. As for Geauga Lake Park (which was renamed Six Flags Worlds of Adventure for a time), its rides were auctioned off and the park stripped down to its skeleton leaving modern day ruins still awaiting new development.

One survivor of the small and regional amusement park mass extinction that has occurred over the past several decades is Memphis Kiddie Park.

Memphis Kiddie Park in Brooklyn, Ohio is an amusement park for toddlers and preschoolers. Here, you hope that you’re shorter than the height stick! There are about a dozen rides, including North America’s oldest steel kiddie roller-coaster. Other nostalgic favorites include the train ride, airplane ride, boat ride, a little Ferris wheel, Merry-Go-Round and more. It’s a survivor of a bygone era when kiddie parks thrived. This one remains family-operated. Located in an old Cleveland neighborhood, it is a delight for generations of tiny thrill-seekers and parents alike. But this decades old secret is getting out and folks from afar are making the trek to this little amusement wonder for their toddlers to enjoy. For park information, click here.

And then there are the two modern day mega amusement parks thriving to this day in Ohio – Kings Island in Mason, Ohio and Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio.  Cedar Point Amusement Park is the reigning “Roller Coaster Capital of the World!”

There’s no secret about that.

Click here for over a dozen more thrilling attractions in Ohio.

By Rocco Satullo, your Tour Guide To Fun and author of Here I Thought I Was Normal and Earth Things.

Tour Guide To Fun

tour guide to fun travel blog

Exploring what’s on the other side!

Trips outside Ohio
but with Ohio perspective
by Rocco Satullo, your tour guide to fun!

New stop added monthly for…

Ohio Feature Stories

East Coast Adventures

Out West Destinations

Northern California Attractions

Plus…

San Francisco

New Orleans

Caribbean Cruise 

Outer Banks

and more stories added monthly to your
Tour Guide To Fun

Amish-made

amish-horse-buggy-ohio

The Miller’s Family Story
By Rocco Satullo, your tour guide to fun!

Amish folk like any other seek greener pastures to stake a claim in the pursuit of happiness.

Harry Miller’s family went from Kansas to Iowa and that’s where he met the love of his life, Lydia. Together, they started a family and added to it after moving to Wisconsin, and from there, Indiana.

The Indiana Amish community was large. Sometimes, Amish adventurers like to start smaller communities and keep things as modest as possible. When they find the right land to begin a community anew, they work together to erect their own schools and such.

An Amish friend and carpenter said to Harry, “Let’s checkout Ohio.” Click here to read the rest of the story.

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